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Created by Dr. Xi on June 06, 2009 18:31:44    Last update: June 25, 2012 12:37:35
You can use the system call from the os module to execute an external program: >>> import os >>> os.system(the_command_line_st... However, the path to the executable contains a space character, the system call treats the strings after the first space as arguments, causing an error. Python doc recommends the use of the subprocess module: The subprocess module provides more powerful facilities for spawning new processes and retrieving their results; using that module is preferable to using this function. For example, using wget to get the google home page: >>> from subprocess import Popen, PIPE >>> (out... or >>> import subprocess >>> subprocess.call(['cur...
Created by alfa on June 03, 2011 12:36:14    Last update: June 03, 2011 12:36:14
Thread local storage is typically used to associate state with a thread (e.g., a user ID or Transaction ID). This example, coming from Java API doc , assigns a unique id to each thread that calls getCurrentThreadId() . The actual usage is demonstrated with the Java concurrency package. import java.util.concurrent.Future; import java...
Created by freyo on April 12, 2011 13:05:33    Last update: April 12, 2011 13:06:26
android:sharedUserId (from Android doc): The name of a Linux user ID that will be shared with other applications. By default, Android assigns each application its own unique user ID. However, if this attribute is set to the same value for two or more applications, they will all share the same ID — provided that they are also signed by the same certificate. Application with the same user ID can access each other's data and, if desired, run in the same process. Declare sharedUserId in AndroidManifest.xml : <manifest xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.co... Retrieve sharedUserId programmatically: import android.content.pm.PackageManager; impor...
Created by Dr. Xi on October 06, 2008 22:48:08    Last update: October 06, 2008 22:50:11
A first attempt would be to create an input file like this: userid password shell_command1 shell_... and feed the lines to the telnet client: cat telnet_input.txt | telnet remote_host #... However, you'll learn soon enough that it doesn't work. You get output like this: Trying 192.168.159.128... Connected to bash... What's happening? The telnet client depleted all input before the remote host had a chance to respond. Since there's no more input, the telnet client initiated to close the connection. Adding a delay between the commands makes it work: (echo userid sleep 10 echo password ... How much time to sleep between commands is just guesswork. You can use Expect to provide more control over the automated session: #!/usr/bin/expect # timeout script aft......