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Created by Dr. Xi on June 21, 2011 15:54:00    Last update: June 22, 2011 11:33:09
Demo code for CSV parsing with SuperCSV parser . Java code: import java.io.*; import java.util.List; imp... Test with a simple CSV file: psmith01,CLASS2B,Peter Smith 1,YEAR2,1,N,ADVANCED,... The parser worked correctly: Line 1 has 11 values: |psmith01| |CLASS2B|... Test with a more complicated CSV file: "psmith01 abc", "CLASS2B " , " Peter... The parser messed up on all three lines: Line 1 has 5 values: |psmith01 abc| |CLASS... Using two lines input: "psmith01 abc", "CLASS2B " , " Peter... It generates an exception: Line 1 has 5 values: |psmith01 abc| |CLASS... Add a new line in item two: "One", "Two ", "Three" Result: Line 2 has 3 values: |One| |Two | |...
Created by Dr. Xi on October 26, 2010 16:07:40    Last update: October 26, 2010 16:07:40
This is a more generic version, which can be expanded to accommodate additional file signatures. import java.io.*; import java.util.*; pu...
Created by Fang on August 10, 2010 21:37:36    Last update: October 25, 2010 20:18:47
The tags <fmt:formatNumber> Format a numeric value as number , currency or percentage - controlled by the type attribute (defaults to number if type is missing). Syntax: <fmt:formatNumber value="numericValue" [type="... Attributes: Name Dynamic? Type Description value true String or Number Numeric value to be formatted. type true String Specifies whether the value is to be formatted as number, currency, or percentage. pattern true String Custom formatting pattern, must follow the pattern syntax specified by the class java.text.DecimalFormat . currencyCode true String ISO 4217 currency code. Applied only when formatting currencies (i.e. if type is equal to "currency"); ignored otherwise. currencySymbol true String Currency symbol. Applied only when formatting currencies (i.e. if type is equal to "currency"); ignored otherwise. It is used only when currencyCode is...
Created by Dr. Xi on October 06, 2008 22:48:08    Last update: October 06, 2008 22:50:11
A first attempt would be to create an input file like this: userid password shell_command1 shell_... and feed the lines to the telnet client: cat telnet_input.txt | telnet remote_host #... However, you'll learn soon enough that it doesn't work. You get output like this: Trying 192.168.159.128... Connected to bash... What's happening? The telnet client depleted all input before the remote host had a chance to respond. Since there's no more input, the telnet client initiated to close the connection. Adding a delay between the commands makes it work: (echo userid sleep 10 echo password ... How much time to sleep between commands is just guesswork. You can use Expect to provide more control over the automated session: #!/usr/bin/expect # timeout script aft......