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Created by Fang on November 08, 2011 20:55:00    Last update: November 21, 2011 18:19:44
In the simple taglib example , I used a tag handler class to implement a taglib. This is an example to implement a taglib with a UI component. The purpose is to use a custom tag to split a string and print each part in a separate paragraph, i.e., print <p>john</p> <p>steve</p> <p>mike</p> with custom tag <my:foreach> : <my:foreach var="who" value="john steve mike"> ... These are the files: pom.xml <project xmlns="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0"... src/main/java/com/example/UIForeash.java : package com.example; import java.io.IOExcep... src/main/resources/META-INF/faces-config.xml : <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <faces-c... src/main/resources/META-INF/foreach.taglib.xml : <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <facelet... How to use: Put the JAR file generated by the above project in the WEB-INF/lib folder of the web app. If the web app is a Maven project, just add the taglib project as a dependency:...
Created by Dr. Xi on April 20, 2011 21:44:15    Last update: May 02, 2011 20:56:58
The String.format() method provides versatile formatting capabilities. This tutorial tries to present these capabilities in a accessible manner. The format string A format string can contain zero, one, or more format specifiers . The general form of a format specifier is: %[argument_index$] [flags] [width] [.precision]co... where things in square brackets are optional, and conversion is a character indicating the conversion to be applied to the corresponding variable value. The only required characters in the format specifier is the percent sign % and the conversion character. A simple example: public static void simpleFormat() { System.out... The Argument index The argument index is specified by a number, terminated by the dollar sign $ . The same argument may be repeated multiple times in a format string. Unindexed...
Created by Fang on April 03, 2010 20:21:15    Last update: April 04, 2010 03:30:22
The tags <c:out> The <c:out> tag evaluates an expression and outputs the result on the page. The syntax is: <c:out value="value" [escapeXml="{true|false}"] ... where escapeXml defaults to true and default defaults to empty string "". <c:out value="${expr}" escapeXml="false"/> is equivalent to ${expr} . If a variable is set in multiple scopes, the lower scope wins. In the following example code, attribute1 is set in request, session, and application scopes; attribute2 is set in session and application scopes; attribute3 is set in the application scope. The results are: <c:out value="${attribute1}"/> : Attribute1 request scope <c:out value="${attribute2}"/> : Attribute2 session scope <c:out value="${attribute3}"/> : Attribute3 application scope To access values in higher scopes, you have to specify the scope explicitly, like this: <c:out value="${sessionScope.attribute1}"/> : Attribute1 session...