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Created by nogeek on November 03, 2010 20:52:49    Last update: November 23, 2011 08:54:44
My problem is simple: in my XML data, a timestamp is provided as a long integer (number of milliseconds since the "the epoch"). When I do XSLT, I want to display it as a readable string, such as "Mon Nov 01 18:08:48 CDT 2010". After hours of struggle, I found: It's not so easy to get the job done with JDK 1.6 There are tons of garbage on the web in this space (suggestions, code snippets that simply don't work) Simple Xalan extension functions was the only resource that's somewhat informative. Even there some of the examples don't work. Below is a list of what worked and what didn't. This works: <xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="h... This does not (providing long value to Date constructor): <xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="h......
Created by Dr. Xi on March 28, 2011 11:11:33    Last update: March 28, 2011 11:13:21
grep is a versatile command with many variations (grep, egrep, fgrep, then various implementations). It uses a regula expression (regex) pattern to filter input. But then there are basic and extended flavors of regex - leading to even more confusion. And, beware that there are lots of bad examples of regex in the wild... There are two critical questions to ask when you use grep: which grep implementation are you using? what is the flavor of the regex? Here are some examples for gnu grep v2.7: # Find all numbers (no decimal point), basic regex... Use the -o flag to show only the matching part instead of the whole matching line: grep -o -E '\b[0-9]{2}\b' The good thing about the gnu grep is that it...
Created by Dr. Xi on September 29, 2008 23:03:40    Last update: September 29, 2008 23:04:08
Variables set automatically by shell: Variable Description $# Number of command-line arguments. $- Options currently in effect (arguments supplied to sh or to set). $? Exit value of last executed command. $$ Process number of current process. $! Process number of last background command. $0 First word; that is, command name. $n Individual arguments on command line (positional parameters). The Bourne shell allows only nine parameters to be referenced directly (n = 1-9); the Korn shell allows n to be greater than 9 if specified as ${n}. $* All arguments on command line ("$1 $2..."). $@ All arguments on command line, individually quoted ("$1" "$2" ...). Variables set automatically by Korn shell: Variable Description ERRNO Error number of last system call that failed. LINENO Current...