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Created by Dr. Xi on March 22, 2013 12:18:39    Last update: March 22, 2013 12:18:39
This is a step-by-step guide to create a "contract-first" web service with Apache CXF. It's a lot easier than doing the same thing with Spring-WS. The project uses standard Maven directory layout. Define the data types ( src/main/resources/hello.xsd ): <xs:schema xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/200... Define the service ( src/main/resources/hello.wsdl ): <?xml version='1.1' encoding='UTF-8'?> <wsdl:de... Create pom.xml : <project xmlns="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.... Generate jaxb bindings: $ mvn generate-sources Code the web service ( src/main/java/com/example/cxfdemo/HelloPortImpl.java ): package com.example.cxfdemo; import javax.j... Declare the CXF servlet in web.xml ( src/main/webapp/WEB-INF/web.xml ): <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <web-app... Wire up the web service implementation ( src/main/webapp/WEB-INF/cxf-servlet.xml ): <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <beans x... Build the WAR: $ mvn clean package After the webapp is deployed (Tomcat running on port 8080), the web service (WSDL) is available via...
Created by Dr. Xi on March 21, 2013 20:29:14    Last update: March 22, 2013 08:58:08
Spring-WS documentation says you can use a Jaxb object as parameter or return type, provided that it is annotated with javax.xml.bind.annotation.XmlRootElement , or is an instance of javax.xml.bind.JAXBElement . But that's a lot easier said than done! For example, if sayHelloResponse is defined as: <xs:element name="sayHelloResponse" type="tns:sayH... then the JAXB generated class is not annotated with XmlRootElement , therefore, unusable for Spring-WS. You have to define the type as: <xs:element name="sayHelloResponse"> <xs:compl... in order to generate a type annotated with XmlRootElement . But that is not always possible. Alternatively, you can use the Maven plugin maven-jaxb2-plugin with the jaxb2-basics-annotate plugin (yes, plugin inside plugin) to inject the XmlRootElement annotation into the generated JAXB class. This is the pom: <project xmlns="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0"... and the binding file: <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="y......
Created by Dr. Xi on March 07, 2013 20:26:23    Last update: March 07, 2013 20:26:23
Create a jax-ws web service with Spring, Apache CXF and Maven. Create the pom.xml : <project xmlns="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0"... Create the web service interface ( src/main/java/jaxws/JaxwsHello.java ): package jaxws; import javax.jws.WebService;... Implement the web service ( src/main/java/jaxws/JaxwsHelloImpl.java ): package jaxws; import javax.jws.WebService;... Create src/main/webapp/WEB-INF/cxf-servlet.xml : <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <beans x... Register the CXF servlet in src/main/webapp/WEB-INF/web.xml : <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <web-app... Build: mvn package The resulting WAR file can be deployed to any servlet container (for example, Tomcat).
Created by Dr. Xi on March 01, 2013 16:09:00    Last update: March 04, 2013 12:28:23
This is probably the easiest way to create a web service in JAX-WS. There are no external dependencies other than Java EE. Assuming that you build the web service as a webapp (say jaxws-example.war), the pom.xml can be as simple as: <project xmlns="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0"... You can implement and deploy the web service in 3 easy steps: Code the service as a POJO (annotate class to expose it as a web service) package jaxws; import javax.jws.WebMethod; ... Declare the POJO as a servlet in WEB-INF/web.xml : <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <web-app... Build the webapp, and deploy the resulting war: mvn package The only catch is, this only works for a Java EE 5+ compliant container such as WebLogic or JBoss. It does not work for a simple servlet...
Created by Fang on July 25, 2012 12:52:40    Last update: September 14, 2012 13:37:57
Summarized from official JAX-WS documentation : Sending and Receiving SOAP Headers To send a SOAP header: HelloService helloService = new HelloService(); ... To receive a SOAP header: List<Header> inboundHeaders = bp.getInboundHeaders... Message logging On the client side, set system property: com.sun.xml.ws.transport.http.client.HttpTransport... On the server side, set system property: com.sun.xml.ws.transport.http.HttpAdapter.dump=tru... Propagation of Server-side Stacktrace Propagation of Stack trace is on by default. The whole stacktrace (including nested exceptions) is propagated in the SOAP Fault and the complete exception stacktrace is visible to the client as cause of SOAPFaultException . To turn off stack trace propagation, set this system property on the server: com.sun.xml.ws.fault.SOAPFaultBuilder.disableCaptu... Update: At least on the client side, the property name has been changed to: com.sun.xml.internal.ws.transport.http.client.Http... The messages are dumped to stdout . For...
Created by Fang on January 10, 2010 00:19:30    Last update: January 31, 2012 16:28:42
Maven is a powerful yet complex tool. When I started learning Maven, the first obstacle was, of course, its complexity. The second, was the lack of documentation that can get me off the ground quickly. This tutorial is an attempt to create a pragmatic guide that aims to get you familiar with Maven in the quickest way possible. The main theme is to get you on some hands on experience to start out and lead you through the creation of a simple Java EE project as quickly as possible. Instead of trying to give you a good read, I try to get you on the journey right away. The topics are roughly ordered by the logical sequence but you can jump around in any way...
Created by Fang on January 31, 2012 15:40:34    Last update: January 31, 2012 15:41:28
This is a simple Hello World application with Spring 3 MVC. Like the default Apache HTTPd welcome page, it displays " It works! " when successfully deployed. The sole purpose is to show the minimum elements needed to setup Spring 3 MVC. I use Maven since it's so much easier than downloading the dependencies manually. Directory layout: ./src ./src/main ./src/main/webapp ./src/... pom.xml : <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <project... WEB-INF/web.xml : <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <web-app... WEB-INF/applicationContext.xml (empty, but needed): <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <beans x... WEB-INF/spring-servlet.xml : <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <beans x... WEB-INF/jsp/home.jsp : <!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <title>H... Build with: mvn clean package The resulting webapp is target/springmvc.war .
Created by Fang on January 28, 2012 13:24:09    Last update: January 28, 2012 13:31:22
This is a simple JSP custom tags library with tag body. Just like the JSF counterpart , it splits a string and repeats the body for each word, i.e., with this markup: <%@ taglib uri="http://custom.tag.com/demo" prefix... output: <html> <body> <p>Hello Tigger!</p> <p>H... With Maven, this is the directory structure: ./src ./src/main ./src/main/resources ./s... There are three files to write: pom.xml : <project xmlns="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0"... src/main/java/tagdemo/IterateTag.java : package tagdemo; import java.io.IOException... src/main/resources/META-INF/demotag.tld : <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <!DO... Build with: mvn clean install To use it as a dependency in other Maven projects: <dependency> <groupId>tag-demo</groupId> ...
Created by Fang on November 10, 2011 13:19:13    Last update: December 01, 2011 19:10:43
You can add custom implicit variables to JSF pages by using a custom EL resolver, in two simple steps: Write an ELResolver class to resolve the variable Add the ELResolver to faces-config.xml Starting from the Maven Hello World example: Add faces API and EL dependencies to pom.xml : <dependencies> <dependency> <groupId>o... Add a simple greeter class ( src/main/java/com/example/Greeter.java ): package com.example; public class Greeter {... Add our custom EL resolver ( src/main/java/com/example/ELResolver.java ): package com.example; import java.util.Itera... Add the custom EL resolver to src/main/resources/META-INF/faces-config.xml <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <faces-c... Build JAR with mvn package Drop the JAR into WEB-INF/lib of a webapp and test the new EL with: <h:outputText value="#{Greeter.sayHi('Mike')}"/> Fixed: the setValue method used to throw an exception, which is wrong. @Override public void setValue(ELContext ctx, O......
Created by nogeek on November 03, 2010 20:52:49    Last update: November 23, 2011 08:54:44
My problem is simple: in my XML data, a timestamp is provided as a long integer (number of milliseconds since the "the epoch"). When I do XSLT, I want to display it as a readable string, such as "Mon Nov 01 18:08:48 CDT 2010". After hours of struggle, I found: It's not so easy to get the job done with JDK 1.6 There are tons of garbage on the web in this space (suggestions, code snippets that simply don't work) Simple Xalan extension functions was the only resource that's somewhat informative. Even there some of the examples don't work. Below is a list of what worked and what didn't. This works: <xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="h... This does not (providing long value to Date constructor): <xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="h......
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