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Created by Fang on April 16, 2012 13:32:10    Last update: April 16, 2012 13:32:10
There are two steps to create a custom function for JSP: Declare the function in the TLD: <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" ?> <taglib... Implement the function (must be static): package com.example; public class UrlTransl... To use the function: <%@ taglib uri="http://www.example.com/jsp/tags" p...
Created by Fang on March 05, 2012 20:11:56    Last update: March 05, 2012 20:11:56
This is a bare bones Maven project to get started with Java JSR 303 bean validation. Directory structure: ./pom.xml ./src ./src/main ./src/main/jav... pom.xml : <project xmlns="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0"... which includes dependencies on JUnit, Java bean validation API and the Hibernate validator reference implementation.
Created by Fang on December 06, 2011 19:03:25    Last update: December 07, 2011 08:54:11
Our custom tag, as implemented in the previous note , is broken when a template is used. Create a template file ( home-template.xhtml ): <!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Stric... and a test page that uses it ( home.xhtml ): <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <ui:comp... Then request the page with URL: http://localhost:8080/facelet-demo/home.jsf?name=Jack . You'll find that our hello tag works inside ui:repeat but fails to get the value defined by ui:param ! What's the problem? Our hello tag implementation evaluated the EL with the wrong EL context! This is the corrected implementation: package com.example; import java.io.IOExcep...
Created by Fang on November 10, 2011 13:19:13    Last update: December 01, 2011 19:10:43
You can add custom implicit variables to JSF pages by using a custom EL resolver, in two simple steps: Write an ELResolver class to resolve the variable Add the ELResolver to faces-config.xml Starting from the Maven Hello World example: Add faces API and EL dependencies to pom.xml : <dependencies> <dependency> <groupId>o... Add a simple greeter class ( src/main/java/com/example/Greeter.java ): package com.example; public class Greeter {... Add our custom EL resolver ( src/main/java/com/example/ELResolver.java ): package com.example; import java.util.Itera... Add the custom EL resolver to src/main/resources/META-INF/faces-config.xml <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <faces-c... Build JAR with mvn package Drop the JAR into WEB-INF/lib of a webapp and test the new EL with: <h:outputText value="#{Greeter.sayHi('Mike')}"/> Fixed: the setValue method used to throw an exception, which is wrong. @Override public void setValue(ELContext ctx, O......
Created by Fang on November 08, 2011 20:55:00    Last update: November 21, 2011 18:19:44
In the simple taglib example , I used a tag handler class to implement a taglib. This is an example to implement a taglib with a UI component. The purpose is to use a custom tag to split a string and print each part in a separate paragraph, i.e., print <p>john</p> <p>steve</p> <p>mike</p> with custom tag <my:foreach> : <my:foreach var="who" value="john steve mike"> ... These are the files: pom.xml <project xmlns="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0"... src/main/java/com/example/UIForeash.java : package com.example; import java.io.IOExcep... src/main/resources/META-INF/faces-config.xml : <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <faces-c... src/main/resources/META-INF/foreach.taglib.xml : <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <facelet... How to use: Put the JAR file generated by the above project in the WEB-INF/lib folder of the web app. If the web app is a Maven project, just add the taglib project as a dependency:...
Created by Fang on November 03, 2011 19:47:38    Last update: November 08, 2011 20:24:47
This is a step-by-step example to create a really simple facelet taglib (in JSF 2 with Maven). Create a simple Maven project with: mvn archetype:create -DgroupId=com.example -Dartif... Three files are created as a result: pom.xml src/main/java/com/example/App.java src/test/java/com/example/AppTest.java This project should be able to build with: mvn package Add facelet API dependencies to pom.xml : <project xmlns="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.... The compiler plugin section is optional. Remove src/main/java/com/example/App.java , create a new Java class as the facelet Tag Handler ( HelloTagHandler.java ): package com.example; import java.io.IOExcep... This tag handler simply prints a "Hello" message. Create facelet tag declaration file src/main/resources/META-INF/hello.taglib.xml : <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <facelet... Build the JAR with mvn clean package Optionally, install it to the local repository: mvn install To use the taglib, simply drop the...
Created by Fang on November 07, 2011 09:41:57    Last update: November 07, 2011 09:42:25
Using JSTL tags in JSF facelets is quite simple: just add the XML namespace for the JSTL tags and use them in the page. An example of using the <c:if> tag: <!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Trans...
Created by Fang on October 30, 2011 20:35:17    Last update: October 30, 2011 20:37:03
This note lists some of the different behaviors I found using different JSF implementations. In the simple JSF facelet example, I used Sun's reference implementation version 2.0.0-RC: <dependency> <groupId>javax.faces</gro... With this version, the DOCTYPE declaration is dropped when the page is rendered. It doesn't matter what DOCTYPE you declare in your templates, the facelet engine simply drops it. The problem with this is, your page is always displayed in quirks mode , despite your intentions to require standards compliant mode. The DOCTYPE problem is fixed in release 2.0.2-FCS . Change the dependency in pom.xml to: <dependency> <groupId>javax.faces</gro... and test again, you'll find that DOCTYPE is faithfully passed over to the browser (view source at browser). You can delete the DOCTYPE declaration in the xhtml template...
Created by freyo on September 09, 2011 11:43:36    Last update: September 09, 2011 11:45:45
When you run automated Android tests with Eclipse or from the command line, you get text output, which isn't good for reporting purposes. If you run a large set of test cases with automated build, the text report isn't very helpful. Fortunately, Android CTS generates test reports in XML with accompanying XSL to make it look nice in a browser. To run your own tests with Android CTS: Download Android CTS Make a new directory MyRepository under android-cts , alongside the existing repository directory. Copy host_config.xml from repository to MyRepository Create directory plans under MyRepository , add a test plan ( MyTests.xml ): <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <TestPla... Create directory testcases under MyRepository . Copy TestDeviceSetup.apk from repository/testcases to MyRepository/testcases Under MyRepository/testcases , create a test...
Created by freyo on September 09, 2011 09:18:32    Last update: September 09, 2011 09:19:23
To add your own test cases to the Android cts suite: Copy the whole example directory: cd cts/tests/tests cp -R example mytests Change mytests/Android.mk to fit your needs: LOCAL_PATH:= $(call my-dir) include $(CLEAR... Add the new tests to cts/CtsTestCaseList.mk : # These test cases will be analyzed by the CTS API... Develop the tests as usual If the test is not added to the CTS_COVERAGE_TEST_CASE_LIST , the build will only generate the xml file for the testcases, not the apk.
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